Creative Cooking for the Global Kitchen

Award winning executive chef David Jean Marteau has been cooking and travelling around the world for over 20 years. David’s recipes aim to awaken the senses, turn the ordinary into the spectacular and educate the palettes of his international clientele. Not satisfied with the traditional, well known recipes of western cuisine, he reshapes, reconstructs and delivers on his promise of great food for the most astute food critic to the homegrown foodies looking to spice up their cooking.

Posts tagged global chef

Apr 11

Oct 21

Crisp Pork Knuckle, a German Delight!!!

Pork Knuckle, a German Delight

To most dinner usually when we place a pork knuckle on the menu or for a promotion, it sounds uninviting. I remember when I was young and started in the trade of culinary, we used to get a lot of them, which we mainly used to make stews or some simple terrines or pâtés, which by the way it is also used in China for those purposes, except maybe in the Philippines, where I had the pleasure to go and explore a little. They have something really similar called “crispy pata” in this case, I believe it is completely fried. Note that the crisp pork knuckle with its huge amount of fat and tendon roaming around it is already not that healthy, but I think that the “crispy pata” as good as it is calls for a great heart attack. Not that the purpose of having the pork knuckle as crispy as I am doing it here or theirs is wrong, but I believe is part of the culture.

 Now being a chef in a hotel, I thought about doing it German style (or some others might say Austrian style), as for me apart from the name, it is the same. Also we called it crispy pork knuckle as I thought my guests will understand right away what we mean compare to the like of the German word “shweinhaxe” or in Austrian “stelze”.

Even though it might sound complicated to do, actually it not. It is, I will say rather time consuming, but once properly done, you will definitely crave for more. Living in Shanghai, it is actually becoming popular especially with the expatriate community, as lucky for us we do have a few Brauhaus, some German style tavern look alike (literally), where not only they serve this great dish amongst many other, but they also do brew their own beer on the premises. So, needless to say that a great pork knuckle in my book has to be serve with some great sauerkraut, some potato dumpling, some nice gravy and of course the home brewed beer. I do understand,  that when we do the crisp pork knuckle at home, we will not have this strong flavored tasty beer to come with it, but I think it should not stop us, and we can definitely buy some great German draft beer in our convenience stores easily.

Now that said, to do a great pork knuckle at home, you just need to boil it in a brine with some caraway seeds for about 2 hours at medium high temperature, they remove it and let it try out for a while, before placing it in the oven to crisp at 180°C for about 25 minutes. and it is done.

As previously mention, you can definitely use the popular side dishes with it, but personally, I prefer to have mine with a nice and rich mash potato, with gravy. Simple and straight forward.

Please let me know what you think or how you like to eat pork knuckles at home or in restaurants.

I would love to hear from you

 Culinary yours

David Marteau

Global Chef

My latest cookbook on Amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/Creative-Cooking-Global-Kitchen-International/dp/0986812501

 

 

Web site: www.davidmarteau.com

 

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ChefDavidM

 

Twitter : https://twitter.com/DavidMarteau


Sep 24

Chef David Marteau gazette: Epicurrean Escoffier Gala Dinner

As most of you who are following my culinary adventure, you must know by now, that i was inducted into the internationnal chefs association “Les Disciples D Auguste escoffier”, well as part of being a menber, and wanted to give back, i was lucky enough to have hosted this month epicurrean gala diner at the parkyard Hotel Shanghai, where 52 VIP guests attended. Let me tell you what a night it was. The organisation alone, took us 2 weeks to do it (very well), from the elaborate menu, which is of course the must, to the restaurant ambience decoration, as well as the training of the service side. As we do have an open kitchen inside our restaurant, i decided that we will prepare the entire menu in front of the guests (here comes the stress), noting that we don’t have anything to hide and very proud of what we do. As the first guests came to register, we started with some beautiful canapes, which to my delight were also a success. keep in mind that i created all of the dishes just for this special occassion. Basically, a night to be remenbered. For those of you who are note in the restaurant or hotel industry, here is a little recap of our master, Augusted Escoffier: Auguste Escoffier was born in Villeneuve - Loubet, a small provincial village near Nice, on October 28,1846. He died in Monte Carlo on February 12, 1935, at the age of 89. During his entire life he had a prestigious career, first as a chef, then as Director of the restaurants of eminent hotels, as a writer and simply as a “very noble man,” in the 18th century sense of the world. The Chef of Kings and King of Chefs. Auguste Escoffier’s cookery career began at 13 when he worked as a kitchen apprentice at his uncle’s restaurant in Nice. He learned not only how to cook but also all the other service, including buying for the restaurant and serving at table. In 1865, he left Nice and went to Paris, then he worked in various department of the kitchens in the famous Parisian Restaurant Le Petit Moulin Rouge. After the war, he returned and served as a chef de cuisine from 1873 to 1878. At this prestigious restaurant, he met and catered to many famous personalities of the time including Sarah Bernhardt, Juliette Adam, and Gustave Doré. In August of 1878, he married Delphine Daffis, the daughter of a prominent editor. Until 1884, Escoffier had established his reputation both as cook and as wrier in the culinary world, in the same year he joined the Grand Hotel in Monte-Carlo as chef de cuisine, at the invitation of César Ritz, the manager, and Mrs. Jungbluth, the owner. This is the beginning of a long standing and mutually fruitful collaboration between the two men that would lead to an era of luxury hotels. From 1890 to 1920, Escoffier took over the management of the kitchen in many luxurious & prestigious hotels like The Savoy Hotel and The Carlton Hotel in London and Ritz Hotel in Paris. for almost thirty years, he served the most famous people of the world and created his own dishes which became renowned till this time. After he left London in 1920, Escoffier returned to Monte Carlo and undertook a very active retirement. On March 22,1928, he was awarded the highest French honor of “Officier de la Légion d’Honneur” at the Palais d’Orsay in Paris, and became the first chef to ever have received this distinction. Auguste Escoffier never ceased writing culinary books until his death in Monte Carlo in 1935. Due to the gratitude and unforgettable memory of Auguste Escoffier, people including his best friends and colleagues in London and Paris, created Auguste Escoffier Foundation. The culinary art museum was established in his honor in 1959 in the house where Auguste Escoffier was born. Auguste Escoffier’s Great Contributions: Escoffier has a constant concern for the revolutionary changes in the cookery art and people’s food habits, and never ceased to make generous contributions to his gastronomic philosophy of refined simplicity in dining. He eliminated flour from sauce and invented new meat stocks and glazes. He instigated the organization of professional kitchen brigades & divided the staff into different sections of chefs; His talent was also recognized as a writer, his great articles and books have since become classics. Escoffier remains today the first and foremost theoretician of modern cookery. Now, that you know more about him, let me introduce the menu that i did for this memorable culinary experience: The canape menu: Salami with basil, mozzarella cheese wrapped with roasted red pepper Mini smoked salmon rose, cream and roe Goose liver mousse in chocolate cups, cocoa powder and orange marmalade Cherry tomato wrapped with basil and mozzarella wrapped with basil on skewer with olive oil Fried camembert cheese with blueberry sauce The Epicurean gala dinner menu:

Ravioli tiède aux champignons et fromage de chèvre, concassée de tomate et mousse a saveur d’huile d’olive

Lukewarm mushroom and goat cheese ravioli, diced tomato, olive oil scented foam

***

Savoureux consommé de poissons parfumé aux safran sur un carpaccio de Saint Jacques Reine, truffes et perles de légumes

Saffron consommé over king scallops carpaccio, truffles and vegetable pearls

***

Roti de filet mignon, macaroni “au gratin”, sauce au vin rouge Merlot, légumes du moment

Roasted beef tenderloin, macaroni “au gratin”, Merlot red wine sauce, légumes du moment

 ***

Petite charlotte au chocolate et menthe, crème glacée a la vanille parfumée aux poivres concassé sur son biscuit

Mini chocolate and mint Charlotte, black pepper vanilla ice cream on its cookie

Please let me know your comments and do share some of your Escoffier stories, if you had the chance to host one.

Culinary yours

David Marteau Global

Chef My latest cook book on Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Creative-Cooking-Global-Kitchen-International/dp/0986812501

Web site: www.davidmarteau.com

 Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/ChefDavidM

Twitter : https://twitter.com/DavidMarteau


Sep 21

Chef David Marteau Gazette, Carrot and Orange Soup Recipe

Orange and Carrot Cream Soup, Herbed Whipped Cream 

 

I created a similar recipe in my previous book, where I mentioned not to add any cream to the soup to keep the earthy flavors. So I wanted t give you a different version, the whole idea with this recipe is to have a soup veloute like, rich and smooth.

 

2 tablespoons (30 mL) chopped parsley

½ cup (250 mL) whipped cream

¼ cup (60 mL) unsalted butter

2 tablespoons (30 mL) extra virgin olive oil

2 cups (500 mL) chopped white onion

1 pound (500 g) carrots, peeled and chopped

½ pound (250 g) medium potato, peeled and chopped (½ cup, 250 mL)

Salt and pepper, to taste

2 cups (500 mL) orange juice

6 cups (1.5 L) vegetable stock

2 tablespoons (30 mL) chopped parsley

½ cup (250 mL) whipped cream

 

In a small mixing bowl, stir in the whipped cream and the parsley together and mix well. Add the salt and pepper to taste, then keep refrigerated until ready to serve.

 

Melt the butter with the olive oil in a medium-size saucepan over medium heat. Add

the onions and the ginger and sauté until golden brown. Reduce the heat to low and add the carrots, potato, salt and pepper, then sauté for another 4 minutes.

 

Pour in the orange juice and simmer, for about 10 minutes, or until it has reduced by half. Add the vegetables stock and simmer for another 10 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Purée the soup with an immersion hand blender, and then taste for seasoning, then serve immediately topping each soup bowl with a spoonful of the herbed whipped cream.

 

Yield: 4 servings

Culinary yours

David Marteau

Global Chef

My latest cookbook on Amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/Creative-Cooking-Global-Kitchen-International/dp/0986812501

 

 

Web site: www.davidmarteau.com

 

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ChefDavidM

 

Twitter : https://twitter.com/DavidMarteau


Jul 9
As most of great tradition do not end, and here is no exception. Jumbo prawn cocktail sauce, neatly served in a glass with some lettuce and some tomato salsa at the bottom of it. Clearly, it was refreshing. The sauce was great and to powerful.A great dish for the hot summer days.
culinary regards
global chef
david marteau

As most of great tradition do not end, and here is no exception. Jumbo prawn cocktail sauce, neatly served in a glass with some lettuce and some tomato salsa at the bottom of it. Clearly, it was refreshing. The sauce was great and to powerful.A great dish for the hot summer days.

culinary regards

global chef

david marteau


simple, yet beautiful. Poached green asparagus topped with pan seared jumbo scallops, creamy white wine sauce and its foam.
culinary yours
global chef
david marteau

simple, yet beautiful. Poached green asparagus topped with pan seared jumbo scallops, creamy white wine sauce and its foam.

culinary yours

global chef

david marteau


here is normally a great appetizer. This one was very different from what i did expect to get. nevertheless, the plate presentation, the flavors, all were there. The goose liver was cooked to perfection, the roasted fig was just right and the crunchy mache leaves, were just crisp. A bit over the top was the 3 types of sauce that were given with it. Maybe overthought.
all in all a great dish in my book
culinary yours
global chef
david marteau 

here is normally a great appetizer. This one was very different from what i did expect to get. nevertheless, the plate presentation, the flavors, all were there. The goose liver was cooked to perfection, the roasted fig was just right and the crunchy mache leaves, were just crisp. A bit over the top was the 3 types of sauce that were given with it. Maybe overthought.

all in all a great dish in my book

culinary yours

global chef

david marteau 


May 30

David Marteau Daily, The Infinite World of Eggs

The infinite world of eggs:

As part of my pursuit to be innovative, we decided at the Parkyard Hotel Shanghai to do an egg promotion. Yes, it might sound a bit awkward but we wanted to do something different and that will really have an effects.

The first thing we needed to do was to find a catchy name, as just eggs was a bit boring. After doing a little brainstorming we decide to go with the word:

 “Br-egg-fast”, basically a combination of the word breakfast with the inclusion of egg, but I am sure you understood.

Nevertheless, now that we finally found the concept around the egg, I needed to come up with some great ideas, that we would be able to do and in the same time keep it up to our standards.

So here is what I did as an example, as you might understand, this short listed menu is just an example:

Hard-boiled egg with asparagus and orange Poached egg on English muffin with green tea hollandaise sauce

Pickled red beet hard-boiled egg

Hard-boiled egg salad on pumpernickel bread

Onion flavored pigeon egg Tea scented quail eggs

Bacon and soft poached egg Oeuf cocotte with cream and chives

Boiled egg with smoked salmon, celery and Fish eggs

As the world of egg is very vast and flexible, basically, you can pretty much do anything you want with different type of eggs.

Here are some tips about eggs.

Cooking eggs:

Egg white coagulates, or solidifies, when it reaches temperatures between 144 °F and 149 °F (62.2 °C-65 °C). Egg yolk coagulates at slightly higher temperatures, between 149 °F and 158 °F (65 °C-70 °C). If a boiled egg is overcooked, a greenish ring sometimes appears around egg yolk due to the iron and sulfur compounds in the egg. It can also occur when there is an abundance of iron in the cooking water. The green ring does not affect the egg’s taste; overcooking, however, harms the quality of the protein. Chilling the egg for a few minutes in cold water until it is completely cooled prevents the greenish “ring” from forming on the surface of the yolk.

Types of egg dishes:

Chicken eggs are widely used in many types of dishes, both sweet and savory, including many baked goods. Some of the most common preparation methods include scrambled, fried, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, and pickled. They can also be eaten raw, though this is not recommended for people who may be especially susceptible to salmonellosis, such as the elderly, the infirm, or pregnant women. In addition, the protein in raw eggs is only 51% bioavailable, whereas that of a cooked egg is nearer 91% bioavailable, meaning the protein of cooked eggs is nearly twice as absorbable as the protein from raw eggs. As an ingredient, egg yolks are an important emulsifier in the kitchen, and the proteins in egg white allow it to form foams and aerated dishes. Soft-boiled quail eggs, with potato galette The albumen, or egg white, contains protein but little or no fat, and can be used in cooking separately from the yolk. Egg whites may be aerated or whipped to a light, fluffy consistency, and are often used in desserts such as meringues and mousse. Ground egg shells are sometimes used as a food additive to deliver calcium. Every part of an egg is edible although the eggshell is generally discarded.

Boiled egg with asparagus and orange

Boiled egg with smoked salmon, celery and Fish eggs

Egg salad on pumpernickel bread

overview of my “Br-egg-fast” presentation

Poached egg on English muffin with green tea hollandaise sauce

soft qauil egg with potato pancake

Flavor variations:

A batch of tea eggs with shell still on soaking in a brew of spices and tea Although the age of the egg and the conditions of its storage have a greater influence, the bird’s diet does affect the flavor of the egg. For example, when a brown-egg chicken breed eats rapeseed or soy meals, its intestinal microbes metabolize them into fishy-smelling triethylamine, which ends up in the egg. The unpredictable diet of free-range hens will produce unpredictable eggs. Duck eggs tend to have a flavor distinct from, but still resembling, chicken eggs. Eggs can also be soaked in mixtures to absorb flavor. Tea eggs are steeped in a brew from a mixture of various spices, soy sauce, and black tea leaves to give flavor.

Preservation:

Salted duck egg Careful preservation of edible eggs is extremely important, as an improperly handled egg can contain elevated levels of Salmonella bacteria that can cause severe food poisoning. The USDA recommends refrigerating eggs in order to prevent the growth of Salmonella. Refrigeration also preserves the taste and texture. However uncracked eggs can be left unrefrigerated for several months without spoiling The simplest method to preserve an egg is to treat it with salt. Salt draws water out of bacteria and molds, which prevents their growth. The Chinese salted duck egg is made by immersing duck eggs in brine, or coating them individually with a paste of salt and mud or clay. The eggs stop absorbing salt after about a month, having reached osmotic equilibrium. Their yolks take on an orange-red color and solidify, but the white remains liquid. They are boiled before consumption, and are often served with rice congee.

Pickled egg, colored with beetroot juice Another method is to make pickled eggs, by boiling them first and immersing them in a mixture of vinegar, salt, and spices, such as ginger or allspice. Frequently, beetroot juice is added to impart a red color to the eggs. If the eggs are immersed in it for a few hours, the distinct red, white, and yellow colors can be seen when the eggs are sliced. If marinated for several days or more, the red color will reach the yolk. If the eggs are marinated in the mixture for several weeks or more, the vinegar will dissolve much of the shell’s calcium carbonate and penetrate the egg, making it acidic enough to inhibit the growth of bacteria and molds. Pickled eggs made this way will generally keep for a year or more without refrigeration.

Century egg A century egg or hundred-year-old egg is preserved by coating an egg in a mixture of clay, wood ash, salt, lime, and rice straw for several weeks to several months, depending on the method of processing. After the process is completed, the yolk becomes a dark green, cream-like substance with a strong odor of sulfur and ammonia, while the white becomes a dark brown, transparent jelly with a comparatively mild, distinct flavor. The transforming agent in a century egg is its alkaline material, which gradually raises the pH of the egg from around 9 to 12 or more. This chemical process breaks down some of the complex, flavorless proteins and fats of the yolk into simpler, flavorful ones, which in some way may be thought of as an “inorganic” version of fermentation.

Source: WIKIPEDIA

Culinary yours David Marteau Global Chef My latest cookbook on Amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/Creative-Cooking-Global-Kitchen-International/dp/0986812501

Web site: www.davidmarteau.com Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/ChefDavidM

Twitter :

https://twitter.com/DavidMarteau


May 22
Here is a traditionnal Chinese soup, mainly used here for its “medicinal” properties. personaly i did eat it and i found found it to be exquisite, delicate and smooth in flavors. the ingredients, consist of the inside of the bamboo, that looks like a skin, it is very soft, and could be rubbery at some point, then a dry sea horse, yes you read well. this one, you have to soak it in cold water for a while, to softened it up. you don’t actually eat it, but hey if you wanna try, please do. Then a variety of mushrooms as well as other ingredients, which i am not familiar with. nevertheless, the end result is simply amazing. If you do have a chance to try it one, you should, Sometime i believe, that good food is not always (but most of the time!) about the look, but rather than taste (always).
bon appetit
Culinary yours
David Marteau
Global Chef
My latest cookbook on Amazon.com:
http://www.amazon.com/Creative-Cooking-Global-Kitchen-International/dp/0986812501
 
 
Web site: www.davidmarteau.com
 
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ChefDavidM
 
Twitter : https://twitter.com/DavidMarteau

Here is a traditionnal Chinese soup, mainly used here for its “medicinal” properties. personaly i did eat it and i found found it to be exquisite, delicate and smooth in flavors. the ingredients, consist of the inside of the bamboo, that looks like a skin, it is very soft, and could be rubbery at some point, then a dry sea horse, yes you read well. this one, you have to soak it in cold water for a while, to softened it up. you don’t actually eat it, but hey if you wanna try, please do. Then a variety of mushrooms as well as other ingredients, which i am not familiar with. nevertheless, the end result is simply amazing. If you do have a chance to try it one, you should, Sometime i believe, that good food is not always (but most of the time!) about the look, but rather than taste (always).

bon appetit

Culinary yours

David Marteau

Global Chef

My latest cookbook on Amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/Creative-Cooking-Global-Kitchen-International/dp/0986812501

 

 

Web site: www.davidmarteau.com

 

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ChefDavidM

 

Twitter : https://twitter.com/DavidMarteau


Jan 13
-foodporn:

really cute pancake 

-foodporn:

really cute pancake 


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